Program overview

Major/minor: Spanish

The Cornell Spanish program offers variety and flexibility and includes courses in Spanish language (grammar, composition and conversation) as well as Peninsular (Spain) and Latin American literature and culture and civilization. We offer literature classes at both the introductory and advanced levels in prose, poetry, and theatre.

Not as obvious are the wide variety of subjects covered in seminar/topics courses and through independent studies, wherein students are able to do in-depth studies of topics and writers which particularly interest them. Recent topics courses include "Women in the Nineteenth-Century Peninsular Novel," "Novels by Galdos," "Latin American Poets," "The Latin American Novel of Social Protest," "Latin American Women Writers," "Gabriel Garcia Marquez in Film and Fiction," "Latin American Fantastic Literature," and "Latinos in the United States."

Spanish majors are required to take eight upper-division courses in Spanish; however, two of these may be taken in a related discipline which has a direct connection with Hispanic culture (eg., Latin American history, anthropology of native Mesoamerican and South American indigenous peoples, religions of ancient Mexico, the economy of developing nations, etc.).

Study abroad

Our program strongly emphasizes study abroad experiences in order to gain better understanding of the Hispanic culture and language. Because of Cornell's association with the ACM (the Associated Colleges of the Midwest) and SIT (School for International Training), our students can participate in semester-long programs in Costa Rica, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. Cornell also sponsors its own block-long off-campus courses, which allow students to study language or culture in a Spanish-speaking country. We regularly take groups to Mexico and Bolivia. 

Careers

Many former students who graduated from Cornell with a major in Spanish have successful careers in art, law, education, diplomacy, and social service. A minor in Spanish is also available and is essentially a slightly reduced major.