2012-2013 Catalogue Supplement


This catalogue supplement applies to the 2012-2013 academic year and lists all permanent changes to the curriculum made since the publication of the 2011-2012 Catalogue.

Catalogue Supplement Index

Updated August 10, 2012


Course Changes

Canceled Courses:

  • BIO 108-2 Topic: Sex and Food: A Feminist Evolutionary Perspective.
  • CHE 121-8 Chemical Principles
  • CHE 122-2 Chemical Principles II
  • EDU 308-5 Language Teaching Methodology
  • ENG 111-2,3 Topic: Writing as an Ethical Act
  • ENG 273-3 Topic: The Writer's Life in Southern Africa (South Africa and Namibia)
  • FRE 265-6 Topic: Lebertines, Pogues and Femmes Fatales
  • HIS 366-5 Advanced Topic: Social Movements and Political Mobilization in the Modern Middle East
  • MUS 323-4 History of Western Music III: Romantic to the Present
  • MUS 346-3 Music Theory V
  • POL 351-3 Advanced Topic: Public Choice
  • POL 483-7 Research Seminar
  • STA 202-3 Statistical Methods II
  • THE 320-5 Advanced Topic: Intermediate Modern/Contemporary Dance Performance Theory
  • WST 306-3 Advanced Topic: Women and Public Policy in southern Africa

Added Courses:

  • BIO 108-2 Topic: Biological Invaders - POULETTE
  • CHE 121-3-B Chemical Principles I - STAFF
  • CHE 122-8-B Chemical Principles II - STAFF
  • CHE 326-3-B Organic Chemistry II Lecture - STAFF
  • ENG 111-5-B Humor in Theory and Practice - MAYER
  • ENG 318-3 Advanced Fiction Writing - ENTEL
  • FRE 101-6 Beginning French I -Baty
  • HIS 366-5 The Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1870-Present: Origins, Evolution, and Prospects - HAGLER
  • INT 502-4 Academic Performance Tutorial - FASHIMPAUR
  • MAT 121-3 Calculus of a Single Variable - J. FREEMAN
  • POL 242-3 International Politics - POULETTE
  • POL 243-2 Comparative Politics - YAMANISHI
  • SPA 205-5 Topics and Encounters in Hispanic Cultures - STAFF
  • THE 263-5 Topic: Modern/Jazz Dance

Changed Course:

  • ENG 322-7 will be taught on campus, not at the Newberry Library.

Additions to the Catalogue

The faculty have approved a new Business minor, effective immediately.

Business Minor

A minimum of 8 course credits, including the following core courses: ECB 101, 102, 151, and either STA 201 (Statistical Methods I) or STA 348 (Mathematical Statistics II); either ECB 301 or 302; at least one of the following quantitative literacy courses, to be taken by Block Four of the junior year: ECB 225, 243, or 254; at least one of the following capstone seminar courses: ECB 352 or 356; and at least one elective from the following list of courses: ECB 206, 208, 210, 225, 243, 251, 254, 311, 354, or ECB topics courses (265-275 and 365-369) as designated by the department.

Students may not minor in Business and major in Economics and Business.


German Deletions

German 341-379 and 381-385 have been removed from the curriculum.


Description Changes

HIS 266-3 and HIS 266-4 have the following revised description.

This course examines the history of the modern Middle East from the twilight of the Ottoman era to the present. The course explores the historical processes which resulted in the emergence of the Middle East as one of the most conflicted regions of the world. Topics include Orientalism, modernization, state-building, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the Kurdish question. Today, citizens are exposed to stereotypical images, information, opinion, and commentary about the contemporary ethno-religious conflicts in the Middle East through public media. The ultimate aim of the course is to provide students with an informed understanding of the historical forces that produced the contemporary Middle East.


Changes in Course Numbering

The following courses have been renumbered, effective immediately.

Computer Science

CSC 213 (Algorithms and Data Structures) is now CSC 301

Physics

PHY 101 (Introductory Physics I) is now PHY 141
PHY 102 (Introductory Physics II) is now PHY 142
PHY 111 (General Physics I) is now PHY 161
PHY 112 (General Physics II) is now PHY 162
PHY 114 (Laboratory Physics) is now PHY 263
PHY 221 (Astronomy) is now PHY 121
PHY 223 (Acoustics, Music, and Audio Systems) is now PHY 123


Changes in Course Name

ESL 306 has had a name change from Advanced English as a Second Language to Studies in American Culture


Off-Campus Courses Taught by Cornell Faculty

These courses involve additional costs and require advance planning. Consult the Office of International and Off-Campus Studies website for course descriptions, prerequisites, deadlines, and costs.

Under Programs Pre-Approved for Funding of the Off Campus Programs section of the Catalogue, item number 6 now begins: For students approved by the ASC to have their need-based Cornell funding applied to the period of time the student is studying with the affiliated program, the College will pay the program all or part of the student’s tuition, depending upon the program charges.  If the program tuition is less that Cornell’s charges for the time period, however, no adjustment in Cornell charges will be made.

Under Other Off-Campus Study (999) of the Off Campus Programs section of the Catalogue, Students taking an Academic Leave of Absence will pay only the program costs, unless Cornell is the credit granting institution, as we are for all ACM courses.


Course Information:

ARABIC

220-7. Topic: Geopolitics of the Middle East. This course will explore the layers of cultural, political and economic affiliations in the Middle East and show how these feed into national, local and individual identities. The span of history in this region is exceptionally large, so this course will focus primarily on points throughout history that have been chosen because they still resonate with people throughout the region today. The three major time periods that will frame this course are:

1) Islam & Empires. In a region dominated by Muslims, it makes sense to understand the basics of Islam, the life of Mohamed and The Early Community because they are all very significant influences in the Middle East today. From 610-661 AD we see Islam arrive and then transform and expand under the caliphs who guided Islam forward after Mohamed’s death. The Umayyad and Abbasid Empires, among others, each had their role to play in the region’s history, but the end of the Ottoman Era (1908-1923) is a major shift in regional politics and control. In many ways, the end of World War I is the beginning of major western involvement in the region.

2) Neo-Colonialism and World War II. This is a period (1923-1947) dominated by uncertainty and a significant uptick in resource exploitation. It culminates in yet another paradigm shift as western power in the region is somewhat weakened, rearranged and ultimately exchanged for home-grown leadership that is anything but stable.

3) Independence, The Cold War and Contemporary Conflicts. This is a period (1947-Present) where most countries in the region first gain their independence. Operating in the murky politics of the Cold War, the region stabilizes somewhat as strong autocracies emerge. Several wars and lengthy sanctions later, the Arab Spring leaves the world wondering what comes next.

Ultimately, the goal of the course is to provide students with a deeper understanding of the contemporary Middle East. Students will also be able to extend what they learn in this class to other parts of the world by using the analytical tools provided by Political Geography. This approach is particularly suited to such an endeavor as it studies how political processes are affected by spatial structures from the state to the local levels over time. The main goal of the course will be to use Political Geography to better understand the inter-relationships between people, state and territory and how they, in turn, affect the notion of identity across the region. HOLMAN

ART

222-1. Studio Art Topic: Ceramics I. An introduction to ceramic processes from mixing clay to firing finished artworks in a kiln. Students will learn both wheel throwing and hand-building techniques with the focus being on sculptural clay work. Prerequisite: Any 100-level Studio Art course. Not open to students who have completed ART 202. (Fine Arts) BIONDO-GEMMELL

276-4. Topic: Why the World Won’t End in 2012: Pre-Columbian Mexico through its Art and Architecture. While recent popular books and movies have sensationalized the idea that certain stone monuments of the pre-Columbian Maya culture predict the end of the world in 2012, these predictions ignore the structure of the sophisticated calendar that the Maya and other ancient Mexican civilizations created and used. This calendar was but one of the cultural innovations, including sophisticated glyphic writing systems and a complex ballgame, which served to unify the geographically and chronologically disparate cultures of pre-Columbian Mexico. Using as a primary text Alfredo López-Austin and Leonardo López-Luján’s 2005 Mexico’s Indigenous Past (supplemented by articles, videos, and interactive web resources), this class will examine in detail the monuments and architecture of some of the cultures of ancient Mexico and Central America from ca. 1500 BC to 1521 AD to understand the richness of their art and culture. The course is structured around cities, monuments and objects from ancient cultures including the Olmecs, Zapotecs, Teotihuacanos, Maya, Toltecs and Aztecs. (Humanities) HOOBLER

277-7. Topic: Masculinity and the Male Nude. The study of the pervasive imagery of the female nude in Western art has engaged scholars since the 1970s and rise of feminism. This type of examination has further inspired research that more recently focuses on the “meaning” of the male nude in art as a sign or symbol from the hard muscular athletes of the ancient Greco-Roman world to the soft and sensuous forms of the nineteenth century. Much of our research will be based in Abigail Solomon-Godeau’s 1997 text Male Trouble: A Crisis in Representation. (Humanities) PENN-GOETSCH

354-7. Advanced Topic: Time-based Art. In this course, students will use sculptural materials in order to create time-based works of art, including kinetic, performance, and other temporal art forms. Students will employ traditional sculptural mediums, including clay, wood, and mixed-media, along with non-traditional materials in order to explore the fourth dimension of time. BIONDO-GEMMELL

375-2. Advanced Topic: Rome Reborn: Caput Mundi from Julius Caesar to Julius II. The Eternal City is revived by the popes throughout the Renaissance and Baroque (1400-1700). This course will use Charles Stinger’s Renaissance in Rome as a springboard for an examination of how the figures and works of ancient and pagan Rome influenced the religious and political works of the early modern period. The course will involve a trip to Tivoli and optional excursions to Pompeii and Florence as a part of the journey; however, most of our attention will be devoted to the city and the works of Bramante, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Bernini among others. We will be examining sites such as the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon, and Saint Peter’s while living in Rome. Prerequisite: one 200-level art history or classics course. Penn-Goetsch (Humanities) Cost: $4,000

376-7. Advanced Topic: Magical Realism and Social Realism: The Muralists and their contemporaries in Mexico, 1920-1950. The Fabulous Life of Diego Rivera was the title of Bertram Wolfe’s 1963 biography of the famed Mexican muralist painter, yet Rivera’s is only one story from an era in Mexican history filled with the fabulous: ambitious and dazzling art and big, eccentric personalities. Rivera was one of three muralists who have become known as “los tres grandes,” - three giants of Mexican realism -- and his life was certainly rivaled by that of the one-armed, dark-visioned José Clemente Orozco, or by the saga of David Alfaro Siqueiros, revolutionary colonel at the age of fourteen; comrade-in-arms of Hemingway from the Spanish Civil War; teacher of Jackson Pollock in New York; and above all, inveterate pioneer of new artistic techniques throughout his career.

Yet Diego Rivera’s star, in art and life, has also been almost eclipsed since his death by that of his wife, the beautiful, talented, and troubled Frida Kahlo. Kahlo was at the center of a web of equally fascinating female artists, mostly little-known, who were working in Mexico at this time. These include María Izquierdo, Leonora Carrington, Remedios Varo, Tina Modotti, and Lola Álvarez-Bravo.

Using personalities and works of art as anchors, this course will examine the artistic currents of muralism, photography and Surrealism over three decades in Mexico, as seen through the works of the above artists and lesser-known figures including Miguel Covarrubias, Dr. Atl, and Manuel Álvarez-Bravo. Dawn Ades’ Art in Latin America: The Modern Era, 1820-1980 will serve as the primary text, with additional readings. Prerequisite: one 200-level studio art course or LAS 141. (Humanities) HOOBLER

BIOLOGY

108-2 Topic: Sex and Food: A Feminist Evolutionary Perspective. The course will explore evolutionary biology from feminist, scientific perspectives. The course will focus on the biology of diverse organisms (including humans), address the implications for contemporary humans, and consider how scientists analyze information. Same topic offered in block 7. (Science) CONDON

108-2 Topic: Biological Invasions. Biological invasions are one of the leading drivers of global environmental change. In this course we will broadly examine the biology, ecology, and environmental impact of invasive species. This course is designed to engage students from different disciplines by including the historical, social, economic, and political consequences of biological invasions in our discussions. We will focus on invasive species that currently threaten natural systems, agriculture, and human health in Iowa and the U.S. Students will complete a project on a species of interest, and class will include short field trips to local field sites. (Science) POULETTE

281-2. Topic: Biological Basis for Sex Differences in Health. This course will examine the biological and physiological differences between human females and males focusing on the influence of these differences on illness and health. We will discuss the history of the women’s health movement and implications of current research on gender-related medicine and health care. Same course as WST 262-2. Prerequisite: writing-designated course. (Science) CHRISTIE-POPE

284-1. Topic: The Nature of Nature (First Year Seminar). The course will explore the nature of nature by discussing the texts of great environmental and natural history writers. We will examine fundamental questions such as: what is nature, and where do humans fit in the natural world? Complementing discussions of texts, students will personally undertake the practices of natural history (e.g., observation, journal writing) and explore the local natural and human-created landscapes. The course will also provide an excellent platform to discuss elements of ecology, evolution and conservation biology. The course will take a required overnight fieldtrip that will cost approximately $50 per student. GANNES

285-4. Topic: Global Health. What is “health”? How is “health” measured? What factors determine “health” of individuals and of populations? What are the most prevalent health issues currently affecting our world? These are just a few of the questions we will ask and discuss in this course. To answer these questions, we will examine disease patterns in populations in both developing and developed countries. We will discuss factors influencing health status such as socioeconomic class, nutritional status, human behaviors, physical environment, access to health services/education, and of course, biology. We will examine the goal to transition developing countries from high to low fertility and mortality, and the shift from communicable to non-communicable diseases. Finally, we will discuss interventions to alleviate disease burdens and the potential for science and technology to improve health. May include a field trip to University of Iowa. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (Science) Christie-Pope

335-8. Chemical Ecology. This course explores how organisms use naturally occurring chemicals to influence ecological interactions. Case studies will illustrate both inter- and intraspecific interactions among plants, insects, animals, and microbes, including behaviors such as mate selection, colony organization, and defense. Some attention will be given to the biochemical origins of these compounds. This course satisfies the Cell requirement in the biology major or the elective requirement in the BMB major. Prerequisite: BIO 205. Alternate years. NOWAK-THOMPSON

384-7. Advanced Topic: Animal migration: Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation. Migration is one of the most impressive biological phenomena: billions of participants, fantastic physiological hardships, and distances exceeding tens of thousands of kilometers. This upper-division course will explore the phenomenon of migration in insects, mammals and birds in the context of ecology, physiology, genetics, evolution and conservation. Students explore aspects of migration biology through discussion of primary literature, experimentation, fieldtrips and individual research projects. Prerequisites: BIO 141 and 142. This course satisfies the Animal requirement in the Biology major. GANNES

CLASSICS

275-1. Topic: Roman History. This in an introductory course in Roman history that will cover major social, economic, and political developments from the founding of Rome to the reign of Constantine, with an emphasis on Rome’s rise to power beginning with the Punic Wars to the reign of Constantine, who transferred the capital of the empire to Constantinople. Topics to be discussed include the civil wars, the creation of empire, Rome’s place in the ancient Mediterranean world, Roman religion and Christianity. (Humanities) STAFF

278-1. Topic: Tragedy and Catharsis (First Year Seminar). Why is it that we receive pleasure in watching the suffering of others? Aristotle answered the question by arguing that we are cleansed or purified (catharsis) by vicariously experiencing the misfortunes of others. Yet the ancient Greeks in the century before Aristotle wrote the Poetics used tragedy to explore ongoing questions about how to live in community: what takes priority, family or community? Is revenge justice? How do we deal with outsiders? Can women be trusted? In this course, we will explore the performance conventions of the Athenian tragic stage and read tragedies from the three great Greek tragedians—Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides—and explore the history of tragedy and its performance from the Romans (Seneca) to the early modern period (Racine). We will also examine how 20th century writers (e.g., Nobel Prize winner Wole Soyinka, Pulitzer Prize winner Arthur Miller, and Poet Laureate of the U.S. Rita Dove) reworked tragic themes for new cultures and communities. Finally, after reflecting on Aristotle’s definition of tragedy and catharsis, we will adapt and re-work tragedies for our own time and perform these scenes for others. (First Year Seminar) GRUBER-MILLER

COMPUTER SCIENCE

301-7. Algorithms and Data Structures. Measurements of complexity. Comparison of methods for searching and sorting data. Alternative ways of organizing data in lists, tables, and trees. Prerequisites: CSC 140, 144, 151, and MAT 120 or 121. (Renumbered; old course number 213.) TABAK

355-1. Advanced Topic: Mashups. We will learn how to develop applications for the Web by selecting and formatting data that our software retrieves from other applications on the Web. We will combine the functions of other applications in novel ways. We will learn to use the Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that developers of popular applications on the Web have published. We will learn to use the industry’s standard languages and methods for describing and exchanging data on the Web. Our goal is to gain skill in creating our own creative applications rapidly. To that end, we will practice building upon the work of others. Prerequisites: CSC 140 and 151. TABAK

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS

265-1. Topic: Markets and Social Networks. Networks pervade our tech savvy society. The people in our social networks influence the books we read, the jobs we obtain, the things we buy, and even the viruses that infect us! This course explores the new science of networks. We identify the common principles that explain the structure of networks and the processes that operate upon them. Students will learn basic mathematical models and play with network data. We aim to answer the following: How do networks explain social, economic, and business behavior? How does an agent’s position in a social network advantage or disadvantage that agent? How are individual and collective behavior related in complex networks? HEJEEBU

EDUCATION

262-6. Topic: Comparative Education (in Belize). This course, taught on the island of San Pedro in Belize, introduces students to the Belize educational system through daily involvement in the island’s elementary and secondary schools. Survey of Belizean history and culture, as well as past and current educational theory and practice, will unfold through course readings and discussion, as well interaction with students, teachers, parents and community members. Prerequisite: instructor permission. HEINRICH

ENGLISH

111-2-A. Topic: Literary Responses to War. Walt Whitman said of the Civil War that the “real war will never get in the books.” What versions of war, then, do get in books? This course will expose students to different artistic responses to war and the critical skills necessary to analyze them. Course discussions will consider the limitations of representation and documentation, the intersections of public and private life, and the uses of art. We will ask such questions as: how can trauma be documented? how do authors represent the unspeakable? what is the purpose of a personal account versus a documentary about the “whole” war? Students will hone their skills in analyzing both primary and secondary sources. They will engage in several different types of academic writing and will conduct their own research projects. Because this is a writing course, significant course time will be spent on the writing process, with a focus on revision. Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. Same topic offered in Block 4. (Writing Requirement) ENTEL

111-2-B. Topic: After Hamlet. Hamlet, the second most written-about text in Western literature after the Bible, is an elusive entity. Based on a Scandinavian myth and perhaps a lost play, it has come down to us in no less than three seventeenth-century texts that present to today’s editors, critics, and theatre professionals a host of interpretive questions. This first-year writing class begins by investigating some of these puzzles through a reading of Shakespeare’s “basic” texts. We then study two rarely screened film adaptations of Shakespeare’s play, and finish with a discussion of other writers’ creative adaptations, which re-interpret the characters and conflicts in Hamlet in daring and imaginative ways. Through discussion and daily writing assignments, you will develop analytical and research skills, and acquire some of the fundamental vocabulary for literary analysis. A research assignment (your third formal paper) will introduce you to the library resources and to research techniques in the field of literary studies. To perfect your writing skills and master the art of revision, you will keep a writer’s journal, use it to draft and revise the formal papers, and generate a final project based on two of these papers. Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. (Writing Requirement) STAVREVA

111-2-C. Topic: Writing as an Ethical Act.  Is literature relevant to lived experience? Can fiction depict reality? Might a poem effect actual change? Does a piece of good writing distinguish right from wrong? In this course we will read literary texts that address social and ethical issues of race, gender, class inequality, capital punishment, violence and the environment. We will acquaint ourselves with authorial approaches ranging from the creative non-fiction of Truman Capote to the raucous satire of George Saunders. We will investigate each approach closely and will discuss the implications different formal and stylistic choices have for content. Amidst these discussions, you will develop your own sense of effective and affecting writing practices.  This course is an introduction to academic writing and is designed to help you refine your critical writing and close reading skills. You will be expected to keep a daily journal of reading responses and to perform attentive textual analysis as well as to synthesize ideas raised in class discussion with your own observations. You will be asked to compare and contrast the works on the syllabus and to develop a nuanced, complex argument in two papers, the second incorporating original research. Great emphasis will be placed upon the revision process and each paper will go through at least two major drafts in peer workshops.  Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. (Writing Requirement) ROSS

111-3-A. Topic: Writing, Food, and Sustainability. Where does your food come from? This course will introduce college-level writing, with a focus on writing about food. Topics will include the cultural and historical significance of food in British and American literature, environmental sustainability, and the local food movement. Authors may include Michael Pollin, Barbara Kingsolver, and Novella Carpenter. Students will do informal writing, write several formal papers, and will share their work with peers in revision workshops. Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. (Writing Requirement) MOUTON

111-3-B. Topic: Topic: Writing as an Ethical Act.  Is literature relevant to lived experience? Can fiction depict reality? Might a poem effect actual change? Does a piece of good writing distinguish right from wrong? In this course we will read literary texts that address social and ethical issues of race, gender, class inequality, capital punishment, violence and the environment. We will acquaint ourselves with authorial approaches ranging from the creative non-fiction of Truman Capote to the raucous satire of George Saunders. We will investigate each approach closely and will discuss the implications different formal and stylistic choices have for content. Amidst these discussions, you will develop your own sense of effective and affecting writing practices.  This course is an introduction to academic writing and is designed to help you refine your critical writing and close reading skills. You will be expected to keep a daily journal of reading responses and to perform attentive textual analysis as well as to synthesize ideas raised in class discussion with your own observations. You will be asked to compare and contrast the works on the syllabus and to develop a nuanced, complex argument in two papers, the second incorporating original research. Great emphasis will be placed upon the revision process and each paper will go through at least two major drafts in peer workshops.  Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. (Writing Requirement) ROSS

111-4-B. Topic: Exiles, Immigrants and Nationalists. The colonial expansion of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries forever altered our world and its effects can still be felt today: in the genocide of Rwanda, in post-Apartheid South Africa and in many other ways. This course focuses on the human toll of colonialism by reading the literature of post-colonial countries. This literature, written sometimes by exiles, sometimes by immigrants, and sometimes by nationalists, raises questions not only about colonialism but also about national identity, personal identity and the new economic colonialism of Globalization. Texts will include literature by Indian, South African and Nigerian writers and critical articles on the socio-economic impact of colonialism and neo-colonialism. Emphasis on critical reading, writing and revision. Some attention paid to writing style as well. Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. Same topic offered in Block 6. (Writing Requirement) REED

111-5-A. Beats, Dylan, and the American Dream. In the 1950s, a period of American prosperity and social contentment and conformity, the “Beats” rejected traditional American values. Writers such as Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs sought out a new version of the American Dream. In the early 1960s, Bob Dylan followed in their footsteps and went on to become one of the most radical, influential voices of the 20th century. This class will explore the work of the Beats and Dylan through aesthetic, historical, political and cultural lenses as a way to explore our own sense of American values. Do these artists have anything to say to Americans in the 21st century? What is the American dream now? We will focus on critical reading and writing skills as we try to formulate our own responses to these important questions. Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. (Writing Requirement) FREEMAN

111-5-B. Humor in Theory and Practice. Humor is a universal human experience and debatably an element of all great literature, but after two millennia of debate there is little consensus about what it is or how it works. In this course, we will investigate theories of humor—from Aristotle’s Rhetoric to Freud’s Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious to Bergson’s Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic—and we will test the merits of these theories by applying them to a diversity of hilarious texts: Stand-up comedy by Louis CK, George Carlin, Lenny Bruce, Bill Cosby, and Demetri Martin; fiction by Lydia Davis, George Saunders, Sam Lipsyte; poetry by James Tate and Russell Edson; riddles and nonsense verse by Lewis Carroll; and other texts. 

Along the way, students will develop their critical reading and writing faculties. This course will require students to apply close reading techniques to ancient and contemporary comic texts and use their analysis to develop rigorously defended arguments. Students will exit the class with not only a familiarity with the history and theories of humor, but also a facility with the processes and forms of academic writing. Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. (Writing Requirement) MAYER

CANCELED 273-3. Topic: The Writer’s Life in Southern Africa. This is a unique creative writing course that will take place in South Africa and Namibia. Students will be exposed to the literary and artistic scene of these countries through readings as well as meetings with writers and other artists. Students will also learn about the role art has played in political movements and development. Students will be responding in writing of multiple genres (fiction, poetry, nonfiction/memoir) to their immersion in culture, landscape, and literary traditions. There will be plenty of inspiration for writing: from visiting South African sites commemorating resistance to apartheid to observing elephants in the Namibian desert. This course is perfect for students who: are interested in the region and its writing, are interested in the ways literature is civically-engaged, are creative, love language, and love adventure. Prerequisite: a writing-designated course or ENG 201, 202, or 215 and sophomore standing (Fine Arts) ENTEL

7-322. Medieval and Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare’s Rivals. In this undergraduate seminar, you will study the drama of Shakespeare’s talented contemporaries and rivals—Marlowe, Middleton, Dekker, Ford, or Webster—within the context of the burgeoning theatrical and print culture of early modern England. The class will introduce you to the history of the book in the era of early print through at least one field trip to a Rare Book collection. We will view a film adaptation of one of the plays, and will ponder how these old texts continue to be meaningful to contemporary audiences, and how their meaning has evolved within new historical and cultural contexts. As a class, we will prepare another text for modern reading audiences, producing a teaching/acting edition of that play. “Shakespeare’s Rivals” is especially valuable for students interested in English, History, Library Science, and/or publishing. Prerequisite: a writing-designated course, ENG 201, or 202. (Humanities) STAVREVA

331-6. Literature of the Romantic Period: English Slavery, Abolition, and “the West Indies” in a Literary and Environmental Context. This course, which includes fieldwork on the Island of San Salvador in the Bahamas, will explore the interplay among literature, economics, and the physical environments of slavery and abolition. Visits to the island’s slave plantations ruins and a familiarity with the island itself will inform readings of English and Caribbean slave narratives, pro- and anti-abolitionist texts, a San Salvador plantation owner’s journal from this period, and literary works dating from the early late 18th and early 19th centuries. The class will pay particular attention to the impact of the physical environment on the conditions under which the English slave trade and slavery existed, and were eventually legally abolished, in this part of the world. Students will keep journals, develop projects, analyze washed-up refuse on the island’s “trash beach” for what it tells us about the today’s environment, and give presentations on their various findings. Prerequisite: a writing-designated course or ENG 201, 202, or 215 (Humanities) MOUTON

351-8. Studies in African-American Literature. Nineteenth-century African-American Literature with a focus on slave narratives. Authors may include Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Keckley, and William Grimes. Fulfills the 19th-century group of the English major. Prerequisite: a writing-designated course or ENG 201, 202, or 215. (Humanities) ENTEL

382-3. Distinguished Visiting Journalist Seminar: Watchdog Journalism. Because it can play a critical role in the proper functioning of democratic government, the press is sometimes called the “fourth estate” or fourth branch of government. In this course, students will explore that “watchdog” role, identifying and exploring current, local issues of public interest using a variety of sources, including live reporting, documents, data sets, interviews and Freedom of Information Act requests. They will learn to organize and conduct investigations that are impartial and accurate in detail and in broader context, and learn to present their findings in a way that clearly shows a lay audience how public officials are addressing -- or are failing to address – important community issues. Readings will include outstanding pieces of journalism, including Pulitzer Prize-winning articles and samples from The American Society of Newspaper Editors’ Best Newspaper Writing. Prerequisite: writing-designated course. (Humanities) HEMMINGSEN

411-1. Senior Seminar: Literary Appropriation, Politics, and Cultural Knowledge. This is an advanced, theoretically informed course about the literariness of literature: about the shards of history in the texture of contemporary fiction, the harmonized duets and discordant clashes of voices from disparate cultural locales in literary texts, the pleasures of recognition afforded by attentive and informed reading, the empowerment of writers and audiences as they adapt and perform anew influential fictional narratives. We will reflect on how contemporary writers and performers – post-modernists, feminists, experimentalists, queer- and social activists from around the globe – have appropriated two of Shakespeare’s most significant plays (I’m considering King Lear, The Tempest, The Merchant of Venice, and Hamlet) to make sense of the past, produce cultural knowledge about the present, and shape the future. We will note how Shakespeare, too, engaged in adaptation and appropriation. Along the way, in class discussion and through individual and collaborative written assignments, you will develop your own literary historical narratives – theoretically informed, personally and socially meaningful, professionally presented with a view of the audience you want to reach with them. Prerequisites: English major and senior standing. (Humanities) STAVREVA

411-5. Senior Seminar: Compassion and Literature. What’s literature good for, anyway? This question is at once provocative, impertinent, and pernicious. In this senior seminar we will attempt to answer this question, but we will also ask if it is the right question. More specifically, we will focus on defenses of literature that claim our sympathy for characters makes us more compassionate and therefore more just people. We will explore this seductive defense by reading theories of compassion and literature and a variety of literary texts that either invite or refuse sympathy for their main characters (possibilities include Nabokov’s Lolita, Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians and some narrative poetry). While the cultivation of compassion offers an attractive answer to that first question about literature, we will also consider its consequences and limitations. Through individual and collaborative assignments, you will work to construct your own questions and answers about literature. Prerequisites: English major and senior standing. (Humanities) REED

FRENCH

265-6. Topic: Libertines, Rogues and Femmes Fatales. From the free-thinking libertines, Madame de Merteuil and Valmont of Dangerous Liaisons to the murderess mistress and wife who plot the death of the man in their lives in the 1955 thriller, Diabolique, men and women who break the rules fill the pages and screens of French literature and cinema. In this discussion-based course, we will read and write about scandalous texts and films peopled by characters whose transgressive behavior, mobility, and power challenged the moral and social codes of their time and place. The “femme fatale,” defined as “a seductive woman who lures men into dangerous or compromising situations,” made its debut in French letters in short, moralistic stories published in the 16th century. Her emergence paved the way for gender-bending representations of both men and women in the French tradition, representations which would call into question not only sexual roles, but also religious and political orthodoxies and the moral exemplarity of literature itself. From the text to the screen, the spectacle of defiant men and women and the articulation of their desire will be the focus of this course. This will be a writing-intensive course taught in English. No knowledge of French is required. Through informal and formal writing assignments and library research projects, students will be introduced to the processes of college-level writing and research. (Writing Requirement) BATY

366-5. Advanced Topic: Introduction to French and Francophone Film. This course will introduce students to the study of French-language film. They will learn about important periods and movements in French and Francophone filmmaking from the beginning in 1895 with the Lumière brothers to the present, possibly including la Nouvelle Vague (films such as À Bout de souffle and Les Quatre Cents Coups), banlieue cinema (films that focus on or are made by people living in the housing projects surrounding major French cities), and films by Ousmane Sembène (a Senegalese author and director considered by some to be the ‘father of African cinema’). Students will develop the critical vocabulary and skills necessary to analyze films as constructed texts and will become familiar with the socio-historical backgrounds that will enrich their understandings of certain films. The course will be conducted in French. Prerequisite: FRE 301. (Humanities) WINES

GERMAN

115-8. Topic: Fairy Tales in German Folklore and Literature. Study of German fairy tales in literature or in folklore, including the famous tales of the Brothers Grimm. This course will be taught in English. No prior knowledge of German is required. (Humanities) STAFF

301-4. Personal Narratives. Development of composition and conversation skills through reading, discussion, and writing about biographical and autobiographical works of selected individuals, from well-known figures such as Goethe to lesser-known authors of private diaries. This course will be taught in German. Prerequisite: GER 205. (Humanities) STAFF

315-6. Advanced Topic: Society in Turmoil. A survey of the Weimar Republic of 1919-1933, when Germany struggled to overcome its defeat in World War I and Nazism rose to power. Readings and discussion of political history and developments in society, literature, and cinema. This course will be taught in German. Prerequisite: one 300-level course in German. (Humanities) STAFF

386-1. Advanced Topic: Germany Divided (in English). An exploration of post-World-War II German society and culture, including the nation’s struggle with the legacy of the Third Reich and the fall of the Berlin Wall. This crucial period of Germany’s history will be studied through the lenses of literature, film and art. This course will be taught in English. No prior knowledge of German is required. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (Humanities) STAFF

GREEK

103-8. Beginning Ancient Greek III. Continuation of GRE 101 and 102. Prerequisite: GRE 102. STAFF

HISTORY

3-261. Topic: Introduction to Modern Middle Eastern History. This course examines the history of the modern Middle East from the post-WWI era to the present. The course explores the historical processes which resulted in the emergence of the Middle East as one of the most conflicted regions of the world. Topics include modernization, state-building, the politics of gender and Islam, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the Kurdish question. Today, citizens are exposed to stereotypical images, information, opinion, and commentary about the contemporary ethno-religious conflicts in the Middle East through public media. The ultimate aim of the course is to provide students with an informed understanding of the historical forces that produced the contemporary Middle East. Same topic offered in block 4. (Humanities) OZOK-GUNDOGAN

262-6. Topic: Trials and Transitions of the Renaissance. In this course, explore the past by taking on the role of a historical decision-maker. Shape the direction of the English Reformation during the reign of Henry VIII; debate the nature of the cosmos in Galileo’s Italy. We’ll explore these complex and dramatic times through participation-intensive historical simulations, in which the students take the lead. Reading, writing, and class participation are all essential. (Humanities) HERDER

331-3 Topic: The Crusades. This course traces the crusading experience of western Europeans in the Middle Ages: the origins and development of the idea of crusade, the interactions between Muslims and Christians, and the consequences of the crusading phenomenon in Europe. More broadly, the class will consider the relationship between violence and religion, and the legacy of the Crusades. Prerequisite: junior standing. (Humanities) HERDER

332-8. Advanced Topic: Women in Medieval Europe. This course examines how law, family structures, religious beliefs, and work shaped the experiences of European women between c. 500-1400. As we read various works for, by, and about medieval women, among the major questions we’ll examine are: What ideas about women’s bodies, minds, and social roles shaped women’s lives? What factors allowed women more or less agency to choose their own life’s course? Prerequisite: junior standing. (Humanities) HERDER

366-5. Advanced Topic: Social Movements and Political Mobilization in the Modern Middle East. The history of the modern Middle East has long been narrated as one of colonialism, imperialism, and state-making. How did the peoples of the Middle East experience these processes? How did they adopt, reinterpret, or resist the forces of modernization? This course will answer these questions by exploring the history of social movements and political mobilization in the modern Middle East. Chronologically, the course starts with the early modern political mobilization in the Ottoman Empire and continues with the nineteenth-century peasant and labor movements and constitutional revolutions. Anti-colonial movements during the interwar period, the Iranian Revolution, and the Intifada will be analyzed as recent examples of grassroots political mobilization in the Middle East. Overall, the course aims to present a bottom-up approach to the histories of colonialism, imperialism, and state-making in the region. Prerequisite: junior standing. (Humanities) OZOK-GUNDOGAN

366-5. Advanced Topic: The Arab-Israeli Conflict, 1870-Present: Origins, Evolution, and Prospects. One of the most prominent conflicts in the world today is the Arab-Israeli conflict.  This course will trace the contours of the conflict: how it began, why it has evolved the way it has, and what the prospects are for peace (or war).  We will focus on contentious issues such as Zionism, the founding of the State of Israel, the creation of the Palestinian refugee problem, the Israeli occupation and Israeli settlements, the Palestinian resistance and terrorism, the status of Jerusalem, political Islam, and the sputtering peace process, among others.  At the end of this course, students will be able to speak and write knowledgably about one of the most important and destabilizing cultural interactions on the current geopolitical stage. (Humanities) HAGLER

INTERDISCIPLINARY

502-4. Academic Performance Tutorial (1/4). College success depends on the ability to organize one's time efficiently and utilize critical thinking skills. This course will teach students the techniques needed to read a textbook carefully, take notes that will be useful, and approach college in a proactive and organized way. This course will encompass three blocks.Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. FASHIMPAUR

KINESIOLOGY

355-8. Advanced Topic: Exercise and Disease. This course will examine the relationships between exercise and disease by providing an overview of the pathophysiology of numerous chronic disease conditions (e.g., diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer) and the role of physical activity both as a preventative measure and as a therapeutic modality. In-depth focus on current recommendations and contraindications for appropriate exercise protocols. Prerequisite: KIN 362. STAFF

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

236-6. Topic: The Spanish Conquest, Revised (Bahamas). This course will address the controversy of the 1492 “discovery”, “conquest” and “civilization” of the Americas. Taught in San Salvador, the island where Columbus first made landfall, the course will make connections with past and present. Students will be able to compare and contrast Conquistadors descriptions of the island and its people with their own XXI century perspective. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (Humanities) OCHOA-SHIVAPOUR

MUSIC

109-1. First Year Seminar in Music: Opera and Film. This course will explore the intersections between opera and film, using theories and practices of both genres, as well as numerous specific examples of the interplay between them. (First Year Seminar) MARTIN

PHILOSOPHY

365-3. Advanced Topic: Philosophic Notions of Self and Identity. This course will investigate the philosophical conceptions of self and identity as it has been defined and discussed in the history of philosophy. How such notions have influenced the modern understanding of these concepts will also be examined as they are portrayed in works of fiction and film. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (Humanities) MIGELY

POLITICS

254-3. Topic: The Nature, Functions, and Limits of the Law. Students in this course will study the means and ends of social ordering through law. That is, the class will explore what law is and is not and what it is capable of doing within the social context. Individual interests are often in tension with each other; they are also often in opposition to a common or societal goal/value. This course seeks to introduce students to the law’s capacity to mediate between these individual interests as well as the law’s attempts at furthering the common good, often at the expense of individual interests. The law is a powerful instrument for encouraging people to work together. However, it is not capable of resolving every problem or achieving every goal. How does the law resolve disputes? How does it maximize welfare and wealth? How is it structured? Who decides what we mean by “law” and how it functions? Who decides what the societal interest is or whether it trumps what an individual wishes to do? Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (Social Science) BRAND

334-8. Seminar: Strategies to Alleviate Poverty. The course explores the nature of poverty in the developing world. What causes it? What behaviors does it induce? Emphasis is on discussing various institutional factors that lead to poverty. The course will explore strategies and programs designed to alleviate poverty at the international, national and local levels, and analyze the role of the World Bank, national governments and non-governmental organizations in eliminating poverty. Can poverty be eradicated and if so, can the solution be found in capitalism itself? If not, is there a viable alternative? Prerequisite: POL 242 or 243. (Social Science) THOMAS

CANCELED 351-3. Advanced Topic: Public Choice. This course will explore the implications of the various methods groups of actors can use to arrive at collective decisions. For example, how does a group of friends decide which restaurant to visit for dinner? How do voters select candidates? How do politicians arrive at consensus on a policy choice? There are many mechanisms actors can use to translate multiple sets of preferences into a discrete outcome, each with their own benefits and drawbacks. We will discuss these mechanisms using real-world examples and in-class experiments. Some of the topics we will cover include the prisoner’s dilemma, free rider problems, preference revelation, voting rules, and political bargaining. This course will primarily draw on work from the fields of political science and economics. Prerequisite: POL 262 or 282. (Social Science) POULETTE

353-1. Advanced Topic: Baby Boomers vs. Babies? Contemporary Demographic Issues. This class will provide an introduction to key concepts in demography and will explore specific policy challenges generated by recent demographic phenomena. Central to this discussion will be an examination of potential intergenerational conflict over policy among aging populations in the United States and Western Europe. We will also explore unique demographic situations of other types, such as the demographic and political implications of China’s one child policy and population aging in Eastern Europe and Japan. Class discussions will be facilitated by a combination of traditional texts (books and journal articles) and online resources. Prerequisite: POL 282. (Social Science) POULETTE

354-5. Advanced Topic: Health Policy. This course will introduce students to the relationship between governments, private firms, and the provision of various health services, including health insurance and healthcare. We will discuss this relationship in both a positive (what it looks like now) and normative (what we think it should look like) fashion. While the largest portion of the course content will focus on healthcare in the United States, we will take a comparative approach and examine health policy in other countries with differing levels of wealth and democratic development. We will also discuss specific policy challenges faced by healthcare systems, including issues such as uninsured consumers, population aging, and the cost of care. This course will draw on academic work from the fields of demographics, political science, health economics, public health, and global health. Prerequisite: POL 262 or 282. (Social Science) POULETTE

PSYCHOLOGY

256-1. Topic: Psychological Insights into Environmental Problems (First Year Seminar). Human behavior is at the root of almost all environmental problems: We drive gas guzzling cars (contributing to both global warming and depletion of natural resources), produce tons of refuse, and deplete water resources (build golf courses in the desert).

This course will explore the facets of psychology that can help explain why we act as we do and how we might change behavior toward greater sustainability. We review some basic psychological principles as they apply to the environment: What are the thinking processes that lead some people to accept and others to reject concepts like global warming? How do people develop their basic value systems, and how do things like emotions and culture impact this? Even when people want to change their behaviors, what are the barriers that make change difficult? What kinds of things drive environmental conflicts (like where to locate a new nuclear plant)?

This seminar will introduce students to college level work: how to find and decipher original research (and how to distinguish this from “popular” articles), using critical thinking skills to reason about arguments, writing at the college level, interpreting quantitative information, the study habits likely to lead to success. Furthermore, because environmental issues are inherently interdisciplinary, I will incorporate a basic introduction to how different disciplines (e.g. history vs. biology vs. creative writing) operate. (First Year Seminar) GANZEL

265-3. Topic: Human Aggression and Violence. This course will examine recent efforts to integrate explanations of human aggression and violence across several disciplines. Students will consider the interplay between social learning, neural, endocrine, and evolutionary explanations of aggression by individuals in their social environment. Topics are likely to include interpersonal and online aggression, workplace violence, aggression within competitive situations, video/computer game violence, and war. In addition to analyzing both primary and secondary sources, special attention will be given the depiction of violence across several different forms of mass media. Because this is a writing course, a significant amount of time will be spent on the writing process, with a focus on revision. Not open to students who have previously completed a writing course. (Writing Requirement) DRAGON

355-2. Advanced Topic: Social Neuroscience. An examination of recent efforts to integrate psychological and biological explanations of social behavior. Topics are likely to include aggression, loving, prejudice, helping behavior, conformity, emotions, and attraction. The interplay between social learning, neural, and endocrine systems in explanations of the behavior of individuals within their social environment will be given special attentions. Prerequisite: PSY 274. (Social Science) DRAGON

RELIGION

244-7. Issues in Hebrew Bible: Biblical Hebrew. Introduction to classical Biblical Hebrew, with an emphasis on grammatical proficiency and sensitivity to the literary expression of the Bible. The course will provide the student with skills to read exemplary selections from the Hebrew Bible, and familiarity with the various genres of Biblical literature. (Humanities) SACKS

SOCIOLOGY

256-8. Topic: Culture, Gender, and Public Policy in Japan. This course will examine the interconnections between Japanese cultural traditions, gender roles, and contemporary public policy. Class members will visit historical, cultural, educational, employment, and religious settings in order to gain a foundation for understanding Japanese traditions, values, and everyday life. Students will also explore contemporary culture by observing and interacting with Japanese citizens and hearing from guest lecturers. These experiences will provide an orientation to enduring historical and cultural foundations that inform contemporary life in Japan. Although a major goal of this course is to provide a broad introduction to Japanese culture, it will place special emphasis on gender and public policy. Specific topics will be selected from the following areas: gender and employment patterns, work and family life balance, education, sexuality, reproductive and fertility concerns, gender and interpersonal violence, developmental and aging issues, immigration and human rights issues, popular culture, and current challenges faced by young adults in Japan. The course will include travel to and within the Tokyo (Kanto) and Kyoto-Osaka (Kansai) regions of Japan. Prerequisite: EST 123, JPN 102, PSY 161, SOC 101, or WST 171. (Social Science) DAVIS [Identity]

257-5. Topic: Gender Diversity. This course will focus on diverse gender identities, bodies, and social presentations. Social practices and pressures of gender will be examined in order to gain insight into the larger contemporary social meanings of gender. We will explore how individuals interpret and present their gender identities, the constraints on such interpretations and presentations, and the larger social implications of gender diversity and gender regulation on cultural ideals. (Social Science) DAVIS [Identity]

358-7. Advanced Topic: Sociology of the Environment. The course will explore the interactions of human social systems with ecosystems, considering the ways in which people, other animals, and plants, land, water, and air are closely interconnected. It will investigate how human consumption and production, along with technology, population, and health are interwoven with environmental conditions. It will also study how the cultures, ideas, moral values, and social experiences of different human groups, from modern Americans to indigenous populations, influence the way people think about and act toward the environment. Finally, it will contemplate a number of ways in which people might act, both individually and collectively, to bring about a more ecological society. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Social Science) OLSON [Institutions]

SPANISH

109-1. Topic: Gabriel García Márquez: Fiction and Film (in English). Gabriel García Márquez, the Nobel prize-winning novelist and author of One Hundred Years of Solitude, was involved in writing screen plays long before he became known as a writer of fiction. In spite of this long-standing interest in film, he has steadfastly refused to allow his best-known novel to be made into a film, believing that a cinematographic interpretation of it would reduce the readers’ participation in the act of interpreting the novel and would cause its inherent ambiguity to be lost. Nevertheless, García Márquez himself produced a number of films that derive from various short stories and his second universally popular novel, Love in the Time of Cholera. This course will explore the major themes in various short stories, a novella (The Incredible and Sad Story of Innocent Eréndira and her Soulless Grandmother) and Love in the Time of Cholera and will examine how the movies based on them (many produced by García Márquez) affect our understanding of the original literary work. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Spanish is required. (First Year Seminar). LACY-SALAZAR

411-7. Seminar: Crítica socio política en la novela latinoamericana del siglo XX (Social and political criticism in the 20th-century Latin American novel). In-depth study of the 20th-century Latin American novel in the context of the social and political issues of the period. Novelists whose literary works will be studied by the class as a whole or by individuals as the focus of a 20-25 page paper include: Gabriel García Márquez, Miguel Angel Asturias, Mario Vargas Llosa, Manuel Puig, Juan Rulfo, Luisa Valenzuela, José Donoso, Alejo Carpentier, and Carlos Fuentes. Prerequisites: at least three 300-level Spanish courses above SPA 311. LACY-SALAZAR

STATISTICS

257-7. Topic: Epidemiology. An introduction to the methods used in the study of health and illness in human populations. Prerequisite: STA 201. (Interdisciplinary) CANNON

THEATRE

261-4. Topic: Puppetry Performance. Design, construction and performance technique for theatrical puppetry. Special focus on development of character through physical and vocal training. Culminates in performance showcase. It is recommended that participants have some prior performance experience. (Fine Arts) STAFF

263-2. Topic: Modern/Jazz Dance. Exploration of expressing story and emotion through movement. Special focus given to noted practitioners including Bob Fosse and Martha Graham. (Fine Arts) STAFF

263-5. Topic: Modern/Jazz Dance. Exploration of expressing story and emotion through movement. Special focus given to noted practitioners including Bob Fosse and Martha Graham. (Fine Arts) STAFF

320-5. Advanced Topic: Intermediate Modern/Contemporary Dance Performance Theory. This class will develop advanced modern dance techniques and delve into the world of contemporary dance as a critical performance based art. Prerequisite: THE 263. (Fine Arts) STAFF

374-3. Advanced Topic: Theatre and the Arts in Chicago. The study of art and culture, focusing particularly on theatrical performance. Typically includes backstage tours, museum and gallery visits, and workshops with local actors, designers, and other theatre artists. Taught in Chicago. Registration entails additional costs. Prerequisite: writing-designated course. (Humanities) VANVALEN

WOMEN’S STUDIES

262-2. Topic: Biological Basis for Sex Differences in Health. This course will examine the biological and physiological differences between human females and males focusing on the influence of these differences on illness and health. We will discuss the history of the women’s health movement and implications of current research on gender-related medicine and health care. Same course as BIO 281-2. Prerequisite: writing-designated course. (Science) CHRISTIE-POPE

CANCELED 306-3. Advanced Topic: Women and Public Policy in southern Africa. This course will travel to South Africa and Namibia to examine public policy in both countries. Both the Namibian and South African governments prohibit sex-based discrimination and actively promote women’s participation in government. We will explore the ways cultural and social ideas about sex and gender influence public policy decisions; the effects public policies have on women’s lives, including housing, education, land use and health policies; and women’s participation in legislative and policy making processes. While the majority of the course will involve meeting and talking with representatives from government entities and NGOs, we will also read southern African literature, policy statements, memoirs, and other relevant documents. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and WST 171, 271, or PHI 352. REED