Suzette AstleyWilliam DragonCarolyn EnnsAlice GanzelMelinda Green (chair)

Major: A minimum of 13 courses, to include three foundation courses, and one of three concentrations listed below. In addition, a minimum of two 300-level courses (i.e. PSY 351-386) must be included within the concentration excluding PSY 394, 395, and 483. Statistics must be taken before PSY 394, and 394 must be completed no later than the end of the junior year and before 483.

NoteStudents must take a 200-level course before enrolling in any 300-level course.

Foundation Courses (required of all Psychology majors):

PSY 161
PSY 394
One course in statistics (STA 201 or 347-348)

Concentrations:

Psychology Specialist
This program of study provides a broad foundation in psychology and prepares students for careers and graduate study in a wide variety of psychology subfields. It allows for specialization through the careful selection of psychology elective courses and courses in the wider context (see advisor for recommendations).

  1. Three foundation courses (see major description above);
  2. One course in personality/social psychology selected from PSY 274276279, or 381;
  3. One course in experimental psychology selected from PSY 272273370, or 372;
  4. One course in developmental psychology selected from PSY 277278, or 386;
  5. One course in biological processes selected from PSY 281383BIO 141 (Foundations: Cellular Biology), or relevant topics courses in psychology;
  6. Three elective courses in psychology;
  7. Capstone course: PSY 483; and
  8. Two courses in the wider context selected from: ANT 101 (Cultural Anthropology);ECB 101 (Macroeconomics), 102 (Microeconomics); EDU 215 (Educational Psychology), 230 (Exceptional Learner), 240 (Human Relations); EST 123(Introduction to Ethnic Studies); PHI 202 (Ethics); POL 111 (Politics), 262 (American Politics); REL 222 (Religions of the World); SOC 101 (Sociological Perspectives: Structure, Diversity, and Interaction), 273 (Families in Social Context), 348 (Race and Ethnic Relations), 365 (Sexualities), 367 (Self and Identity); or WST 171 (Introduction to Women's Studies). Depending on the specific programs of students, other courses may be considered on a case by case basis.

Psychological Scientist
This program of study is recommended for students who are considering graduate study in biological, learning, cognitive, or other subfields of psychology in which biological and/or quantitative factors are important, as well as for those interested in neuroscience or health-related careers.

  1. Three foundation courses (see major description above);
  2. One course in personality/social psychology selected from PSY 274276279, or 381;
  3. One course in experimental psychology selected from PSY 272273370, or 372;
  4. One course in developmental psychology selected from PSY 277278, or 386;
  5. One course in biological processes selected from PSY 281383BIO 141 (Foundations: Cellular Biology), or relevant topics courses in psychology;
  6. Two elective courses in psychology;
  7. STA 202 (Statistical Methods II);
  8. Capstone course: PSY 483; and
  9. Two courses in the wider scientific and quantitative context: BIO 141 (Foundations: Cellular Biology), 142 (Foundations: Organismal Biology); CHE 121122 (Chemical Principles I and II), 161 (Accelerated General Chemistry); or MAT 120 or 121 (Calculus of a Single Variable). Depending on the specific programs of students, other courses may be considered on a case by case basis.

Psychological Services
This program of study prepares students for work in psychological services following the completion of their undergraduate degree, and provides a foundation for those planning to pursue a master's degree program in an applied area of psychology or a related field. Students who plan to pursue doctoral level graduate study in psychology or related fields are strongly urged to enroll in the PSY 483 (Senior Seminar) capstone course.

  1. Three foundation courses (see major description above);
  2. One course on theoretical foundations for practice selected from PSY 279 or 381;
  3. One course in developmental psychology selected from PSY 277278, or 386;
  4. One course relevant to diversity selected from PSY 276374EDU 240 (Human Relations), EST 123 (Introduction to Ethnic Studies), or WST 171 (Introduction to Women's Studies);
  5. One course in an area of practice or applied psychology selected from PSY 377, 379, 382, 383, or relevant topics courses;
  6. Two elective courses in psychology;
  7. Capstone experience: PSY 395 or 483; and
  8. Three courses in the wider context selected from: ANT 101 (Cultural Anthropology);ECB 101 (Macroeconomics), 102 (Microeconomics); EDU 215 (Educational Psychology), 230 (Exceptional Learner), 240 (Human Relations); EST 123(Introduction to Ethnic Studies); PHI 202 (Ethics); POL 111, (Politics), 262 (American Politics), 282 (Public Policy); REL 222 (Religions of the World); SOC 101 (Sociological Perspectives: Structure, Diversity, and Interaction), 273 (Families in Social Context),348 (Race and Ethnic Relations), 365 (Sexualities), 367 (Self and Identity); or WST171 (Introduction to Women's Studies). Depending on the specific programs of students, other courses may be considered on a case by case basis.

Teaching Major: PSY 161272273274277279381, one other 300-level Psychology course, and one course in statistics (STA 201 or 347-348). In addition to the foregoing requirements, prospective teachers must also apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program (preferably at the start of their sophomore year) and complete coursework leading to secondary certification described under Education. Prospective teachers should request a current list of the specific course requirements from the Education Office.

Second Teaching Area in Psychology: The following program in conjunction with ateaching major in Anthropology (individualized major), Economics and BusinessHistory,Politics, or Sociology will enable the student to apply for certification to teach both the major subject and Psychology: PSY 161 and any three of the following Psychology courses:272273274, and 277.

Minor: A minimum of six course credits in Psychology which include PSY 161, at least two 200-level courses, and at least two 300-level courses (i.e. PSY 351-386). Although students who are completing the minor may enroll in the following courses to expand their exposure to psychology, these courses may not be included in the six course credits required for the minor: PSY 280/380 and 290/390. A student must be a declared major in order to enroll in PSY 394 or 483.

161. Fundamentals of Psychological Science
Scientific study of behavior. Topics may include learning, development, personality, perception, physiological bases of behavior, the behavior of individuals in groups, and abnormal behavior. (Social Science) ASTLEYDRAGONJANSSENS-RUD, or STAFF

255 through 265. Topics in Psychology
Selected topics of current interest in psychology. See Topics Courses. (Social Science)

272. Cognitive Psychology
A critical examination of memory and thought processes. Topics are likely to include: object recognition, attention, concept formation, memory systems, visual imagery, problem solving, judgment, language, and individual differences in cognition related to age, gender, and culture. Laboratory sessions will give students first-hand experiences with the phenomena covered in the class. Prerequisite: PSY 161. (Social Science) ASTLEY

273. Learning and Behavior
Experimental and theoretical approaches to the understanding of classical and instrumental conditioning. Among the topics to be covered are reflexive and unlearned behaviors, situational factors in classical and operant conditioning, optimum circumstances for use of reinforcement and punishment, effects of aversive stimuli, choice behavior, learned food preferences, behavior modification, use of conditioning principles in psychotherapy, and observational learning. Prerequisite: PSY 161. (Social Science)ASTLEY

274. Social Psychology
An examination of the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors of individuals within their social environment. Topics will include: conformity, propaganda, persuasion, social cognition, self-justification, human aggression, prejudice, attraction, and loving relationships. Emphasis will be placed on critically examining experimentally-derived theories and testing them within naturalistic settings. This will involve data collection off-campus on a weekend.  (Social Science) DRAGON

276. Multicultural Psychology
An examination and critique of psychological knowledge from a multicultural perspective. Topics include: the social construction of Western psychology; cultural variations in concepts of personality, intelligence, human development, social behavior, gender, and abnormal behavior; research methodology issues; culture and communication; and psychological perspectives on oppression, prejudice, and racism.  (Social Science) ENNS

277. Child Development
Physiological, cognitive, social, and cultural influences on development from conception through middle childhood. Emphasis on building an integrated picture of child development and an appreciation of how theory and data can be applied to the analysis of practical issues. Fifteen to twenty hours of observation in daycares/preschools. Students must provide their own transportation. Prerequisite: PSY 161. (Social Science) JANSSENS-RUD or STAFF

278. Adolescence
Investigation of research on biological, cognitive, and cultural influences on adolescent development. Includes the impact of family, peers, school, media, and work, as well as identity, gender, and sexuality development. Also includes a discussion of problem behaviors (e.g., eating disorders, juvenile delinquency, alcohol use/abuse) often associated with adolescence. Course involves application of research findings to individual cases. Suggested prerequisite: PSY 161. (Social Science) GANZEL

279. Personality Theories
Survey of major research and theoretical approaches to personality, including psychodynamic, humanistic, learning, cognitive, and dispositional theories. Research evidence and theoretical consistency/usefulness concerning each approach. Current issues and debates. (Social Science) ENNS

281. Biopsychology
Neural and endocrine systems and their relationships with sensation, learning and memory, eating and drinking, sleep, sex, emotion, consciousness, communication, and psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 161GREEN

290/390. Individual Project: see Courses 290/390.

351 through 360. Advanced Topics in Psychology
Critical evaluation of an issue currently under serious discussion by psychologists or of a contemporary problem to which a psychological perspective is relevant. See Topics Courses. (Social Science)

370. Memory
Research and theory about remembering and forgetting. Topics will include: models of memory (including neural network approaches), brain processes in memory, the role of images in memory, reconstructive processes in memory, memory and development, and how to improve memory. Prerequisites: PSY 161 and any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) STAFF

372. Cognition, Evolution, and Learning
An examination of cognitive and adaptive processes in learning. The course will cover fundamental principles of learning. However, the primary focus will be on how cognitive processes, such as the perception of regularities in the environment and memory, affect learning. In addition, the course will examine the role of adaptive processes in shaping learning capabilities in various species of organisms. Prerequisites: PSY 161 and any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science)

374. Psychology of Women and Gender
Critical examination of theories, research, and historical perspectives relevant to women and gender. Topics include socialization, stereotyping and bias, life choices and roles, nature/nurture questions, physical and mental health, violence against women, and diversity among women and men. Prerequisites: PSY 161 and any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) GREEN

377. Abnormal Child/Adolescent Psychology
A survey of emotional and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents, including the description of various behaviors, symptoms, syndromes, and disorders as well as research on child and adolescent disorders. The course explores multiple developmental pathways of children and adolescents as well as risks and protective factors that may influence the likelihood of developing a disorder. The course also addresses why and under what conditions disorders persist into adulthood. Prerequisites: PSY 161 and any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) JANSSENS-RUD

379. Intimate Relationships
An examination of the theoretical and experimental psychological literature on loving and romantic relationships. Topics discussed include: interpersonal attraction, relationship development, sexuality, social power, communication, jealousy and envy, conflict and dissolution, loneliness, social networks, and relationship counseling. There may be a field trip to collect data for an empirical research project. Prerequisite: any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) DRAGON

380. Human Services Practicum (1/2-1)
Application of psychological principles in an applied off-campus setting. Prerequisites: a declared major in Psychology, two course credits in Psychology relevant to the topic of the practicum, and permission of instructor. The maximum credit that may be earned in a Psychology practicum is three course credits. Students must provide their own transportation and purchase professional liability insurance through the American Psychological Association. See Courses 280/380. (CR)

381. Abnormal Psychology
Etiology, dynamics, and treatment of mental disorders. Problems of diagnosis, prevention, and therapy in relation to such disturbances as transient and long-term reactions to stress, depression, anxiety disorders, addictions, schizophrenia, somatoform and dissociative disorders, and other problems in living. Field trips to selected institutions. Prerequisite: any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) ENNS

382. Counseling and Psychotherapy
Major theories of therapy and counseling. Views of practitioners and theorists of various orientations. Prerequisite: any 200-level Psychology course. Recommended prerequisite: PSY 279. (Social Science) GREEN

383. Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine
Mind and body are inextricably linked, interacting in complex ways to contribute jointly to illness, disease, health, and well-being. Thus, the study of the mind (i.e., Psychology) has been integrated with the study of physical health (i.e., Medicine) to create the closely related fields of Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) to comprehend and integrate psychological and biomedical knowledge in order to better understand health and illness, and 2) to examine social and behavioral aspects that contribute to physical health and well-being. Prerequisites: PSY 161 and any 200-level Psychology course. (Social Science) GREEN

386. Adult Development and Aging
Cognitive, social, and personality development from early through late adulthood. Themes of continuity and change in examining issues of family, work, gender, biological changes, and death and bereavement. Prerequisite: any 200-level Psychology course. Alternate years. (Social Science)

394. Research Methods
Examination of research designs, statistical tests, and procedures used to establish principles of psychology. Laboratory exercises and research reports written in APA style. Prerequisites: any 200-level Psychology course, statistics (either STA 201 or 347-348),and Psychology major. No S/U option. (Social Science) ASTLEYDRAGON, or GREEN

395. Human Services Practicum and Seminar
Supervised full-time internship in a human service context and a weekly seminar. Group discussions of current issues in the field such as cultural and gender diversity, ethics, professional practice challenges, and the role of research in practice. Students must provide their own transportation and purchase professional liability insurance through the American Psychological Association. Prerequisites: three Psychology courses, declared Psychology major, junior standing, and permission of instructor. No S/U option. JANSSENS-RUD (CR)

483. Senior Seminar
Each participant chooses a topic within psychology to be explored through periodic presentations and discussion. A paper critically reviewing research and theorizing on the topic chosen. Group discussions of current issues in the field such as gender and cultural diversity in psychology, the balance between research and clinical practice in professional development, and animal welfare. Prerequisites: PSY 394 and Psychology major with senior standing. No S/U option. ENNS or GREEN

485. Research in Psychology (1/2-1)
Reading in depth on a topic in a selected area and the pursuit of an empirical problem related to the topic. May be repeated for credit to a maximum in both PSY 485 and PSY 511of three course credits. Prerequisites: a declared major in Psychology, one Psychology course relevant to the topic, and permission of the instructor.

511. Extended Research in Psychology (1/4)
Reading in depth on a topic of current interest and the pursuit of an empirical problem related to the topic. Must be taken over four consecutive terms. Maximum number of credits allowed: same as for PSY 485. (CR)

512. Reading and Conversation in Psychology (1/4)
Weekly discussion of articles and topics of interest in psychology. Three meetings per term for four terms, with one or two hours of outside reading in preparation for each discussion. Prerequisite: one college-level course in Psychology. (CR)