Jorgensen Culberson Picture

Lucas Jorgensen and Adam Culberson with their wireless power transmission system.

2013-14

2012-13

2011-12

2010-11

2009-10

  • Valerie Collins, Fadzai Fungura, and Zach Zasada studied solar cells based on quantum dots.  Link to a video that shows Valerie Collins in the process of creating a series of quantum dots each with a slightly different size.
  • Raghav Kunnawalkam built his own detectors to study cosmic ray muons.

2007-08

  • Julia Kamenetzky studied extrasolar planets by observing planet transits.
  • Adam Culberson and Lucas Jorgensen built and studied a system to wirelessly transfer electric power using magnetic resonance.
  • Andrew Reindel studied copper fractals by electrochemically depositing copper on a copper wire.

2005-06

  • Logan Squiers and Zoe Downing built a ruby laser for the purpose of making pulsed laser holograms.
  • Sarah Collins and Esther Chapman built and studied solar cells using raspberry juice.
  • Tim Harrington-Taber built a device for studying sonoluminescence which uses ultrasound to produce light.
  • Julie Jozwiak and Ian Dees constructed a Foucault pendulum which demonstrates that the Earth is rotating.
  • Chad Compton built a TEA laser which produced extremely short (ns) pulses of ultraviolet light using air at atmospheric pressure as the lasing medium.

2003-04

  • Nathan Means and Paul Searing built a nitrogen laser which produced extremely short (ns) pulses of ultraviolet light using low pressure nitrogen as the lasing medium.
  • Jeffrey Klein, Michelle Peterson, Erin Rooney, and Kyle Slack constructed a scanning tunneling microscope capable of resolving objects at an atomic dimension.

2001-02

  • Tessa Parshall, Tom Reyes, and Scott Tolliver built a spectrohelioscope capable of observing the sun's corona in broad daylight. (Shown on right.)

Videos of Student Work

This video shows Valerie Collins in the process of creating a series of quantum dots each with a slightly different size. As the quantum dots grow larger, their adsorption spectra changes and the color of the dots changes accordingly. All the quantum dots shown here are chemically identical, but their spectra are all different.