Advanced French Courses

French 254: French Women Writers in Translation
We will read and discuss texts by the scandalous George Sand, the incomparable Colette, the controversial Monique Wittig, and more. All texts and discussions are in English, with the exception that students counting this course towards a French major or minor will read works in French. September 2008.

French 301: Composition and Conversation
In this course you will further perfect your French, particularly reading, writing, and speaking. Pre-requisite: French 205 or placement into 301.

French 302: Advanced Conversation Abroad
For students who wish to achieve greater fluency and an understanding of life in a Francophone country. This course will focus on oral comprehension, speaking and writing skills, and the acquisition of cultural competencies. Course assignments, readings and final research project will be tailored to the specific destination chosen. This course is taught in conjunction with FRE 206, and students in both courses will do some activities together.  Registration entails additional costs. Prerequisites: FRE 205 and permission of instructor. Alternate years.

French 303: Cultures of France and the Francophone World
Contemporary French and Francophone culture viewed through the lenses of media, cinema, literature, politics, and popular culture. Students will study the historical, political, geographic, and cultural meanings of the post-colonial term "Francophonie," and will interrogate what it means to be "French" in a globalized world. Coursework includes both formal and informal writing assignments, a mid-term examination, and a final research project with oral presentation. Prerequisite: FRE 205 or 206; FRE 301 is strongly recommended. Alternate years.

French 311: Introduction to Literary Analysis in French
Introduction to a variety of French literary genres from the Medieval period to the 20th century, including poetry, theatre, the "nouvelle," and the novel. Students will develop their skills in advanced reading and analytical writing through formal writing assignments and oral presentations. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or permission of instructor.

French 315: Medieval French Literature
In this course, students will study a variety of literary genres of the French Middle Ages, including the epic Chanson de Roland, songs of the Troubadours and Trouvères, chivalric romance, the tragic love story of Tristan and Yseut, satirical farce, the Lais of Marie de France, and Christine de Pisan’s Livre de la cité des dames. Our analysis of literature will be grounded in the political and socio-cultural landscape of the era. Course themes include feudalism, courtly love, the chivalric code of honor, sexual roles and identities, and the polemical Querelle des Femmes. Some readings are in English to provide background historical and cultural information, but all primary texts are in French. Students will develop their skills in advanced reading and analytical writing through informal and formal writing assignments and oral presentations in French. Prerequisite: FRE 311. Offered every third year.

French 321: The French Renaissance: Sixteenth Century Literature
Beginning with Rabelais and ending with the best-selling serial genre of Histoires Tragiques, this course will introduce students to a variety of literary genres in sixteenth-century France, including poetry, the short story, and the essay. At a time when the choice of French as a literary language of high culture was subject to passionate debate, French writers paved the way for an emergent national literature and identity. Our analysis of literature will be grounded in the political and socio-cultural landscape of the era. Course themes include the French humanist tradition, violent religious factionalism, sexual roles and identities, the differences between court and popular culture, and the poetics (and politics) of imitation of ancient and Italian examples. French cinematic depictions of the era will also be studied. Some readings are in English to provide background historical and cultural information, but all primary texts are in French. Students will develop their skills in advanced reading and analytical writing through informal and formal writing assignments and oral presentations in French. Prerequisite: FRE 311. Offered every third year.

French 331: Enlightenment: Eighteenth Century French Literature
The intellectual quest of the philosophes and the Encyclopédistes, with selected readings from Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, and Montesquieu. Development of the drama, the novel, and pre-Romanticism. Pre-requisite: French 311. 

French 341: Nineteenth Century: 1800-1850
Virilized women and feminized men: the Romantics and the Realists fight it out. Pre-requisite: French 311. 

French 342: Nineteenth Century: 1850-1900
Find out why officials tried to ban Les Fleurs du Mal and Madame Bovary. We'll read the symbolists, the Dickensian Zola, the outrageous Ubu roi, and more. Pre-requisite: French 311. 

French 9-351: Contemporary Literature I: Writing as Political Action
Revolt and revolution--French writers take on society. From the Surrealists to the turbulent 70's, from the African diaspora to uppity women, we look at how writers try to change their worlds. Includes Surrealism, the Négritude Movement, Existentialism and World War II, and the aftermath of Mai '68 as seen in movements of social liberation.

French 352: Contemporary Literature II: la littérature psychologique et autoréférentielle
From the high society of Paris to the barren isolation of the Canadian winter, we look at the psychological analysis of life and love in Proust, the obsessive characters in Theatre of the Absurd and Robbe-Grillet's "nouveau roman"; and two Québécois writers who transform the often tragic results of sexual desire into dark comedy. Pre-requisite: French 311.

French 411: Junior-Senior Seminar
Studies in depth in a literary movement, area, or author. Required of all French majors; minors are also welcome. Prerequisite: 311 and junior status, or permission of instructor.

French 390: Individual Project

French 480: Internship

French 988: School for International Training Programs
There are currently eight programs in France or Francophone countries run by the School for International Training. There are language and culture semesters in Cameroon, France, Madagascar, and Morocco. There is a language immersion semester in France, a semester with an emphasis on the environment in Madagascar, and semester with an emphasis on international studies in Switzerland, and a semester in international business in France. Deadline for applying is February 1 for the following year.

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