There is an old saying in life that states "Everything is negotiable". This may be the case, and you can make an attempt to negotiate for whatever you want, at whatever level, however when it comes to early career employment negotiations a recent college graduate must first know what they are worth, as well as how much a particular job is worth. Many employers have set salaries for which they will pay an entry level employee. Though an actual salary may not be negotiable (this is usually the case for internship programs), there other benefits such as paid time-off, professional development and graduate school reimbursement, transportation, gym memberships and flexible work hours that can all be taken into consideration.

It is recommended that a candidate for a position doesn't bring up compensation until after an offer is made. You don't want an employer to end an interview process because they think you are too expensive. It is best to do your research and come up with a range to present to the employer. If you can back up your salary range with published research, that should help in your favor.

Additionally, it is important to never accept an offer as soon as it is made. Even if you are pleased with the offer, take a day or two to think things over. You never know, putting a potential employer off for a couple days may result in an increased offer should you be their number one candidate.

Below is a list of resources to assist you with compiling salary data, as well as negotiating tips:

NACE Salary Calculator

Riley Guide

Ace the Interview Salary Negotiations

Salary.com

How To Make $1000 a Minute 

Career Bliss Salary

 

Financial and Insurance Tips

The Consumers Union Guide to the Affordable Care Act
This free, easy-to-use guide walks the reader through several aspects of the ACA to explain the impact of ACA on Medicare beneficiaries & insured and uninsured individuals--that is, “consumers” -- this comes from the folks who produce Consumer Reports, after all.

Young Invincibles Graduation Toolkit  helps young adults find out how to get insurance coverage and services, whether or not they are enrolled in school:  

Expert advice on understanding credit card offers, incentives, etc. at the Credit Card Insider.


Guidance on how to better manage personal finances at HandsOnAdvice.com

 

CashCourse