Yoko Ono Calls During Opening

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL, Art Professor Tony Plaut  wrote Yoko Ono and asked her to call him on the telephone on display. Ono called at 1:27 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 13, moments before the exhibit opening. A loose transcription of their brief conversation is now part of the exhibit.

“Do you want to interview me or is this a performance art piece?” Ono asked.

“This is a performance art piece. We don’t really need to talk. I just wanted you to call. I have been very inspired by your work,” Plaut replied.

“It is important for artists to support one another. Keep doing good art work,” Ono told Plaut.

For more about the show and the artist, please refer to the text below the photo gallery.

Visit Tony Plaut's personal pages

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

Yoko and the Window Wall 

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

Acrylic on canvas (Luce Gallery installation view) 

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

The "Yoko Phono" (acrylic on canvas) 

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

"Over and Over" (movie projected on moving fan) 

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

Detail of "Over and Over" (movie projected on moving fan) 

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

"Typer Piper" in use in Luce Gallery (musical typewriter) 

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

Plaut's "Yoko Phono" and paintings in the Luce Gallery 

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

Artist Tony Plaut in Luce Gallery 

YOKO and the WINDOW WALL  

Opening reception for "Yoko and the Window Wall" 

Photos by Aaron Hall

About YOKO and the WINDOW WALL

On Jan. 13 – Feb. 10, 2008 the Peter Paul Luce Gallery hosted the exhibition of recent works by Professor Anthony Plaut titled YOKO and the WINDOW WALL. The exhibition included oil paintings, sculpture, drawings and an homage to Yoko Ono.

Plaut was born in Boston, and raised in Palo Alto, California and Washington D.C. He earned his B.S.S. from Cornell College, his MFA from the University of Chicago and joined the faculty at Cornell in 1988. He has exhibited widely throughout the Midwest, with major shows in Chicago and Des Moines.

Of his recent work he says, “I tend to work in series, and this show includes three different directions I pursued during this period. There are very tight connections between pieces within each series and somewhat less obvious connections from series to series. One of the benefits of having a large show like this is the opportunity to stand back from the individual works and see them each as part of a totality.”

“Since the late seventies I have been aware of the art work of Yoko Ono and a few years ago I saw her retrospective exhibition in Minneapolis,” said Plaut, “I was very inspired by her conceptual ingenuity and gentle aesthetic.”

This exhibition was made possible through the generosity of the Henry Luce Foundation, Inc.